Science

The science curriculum at Loyola Academy utilizes a "hands-on" approach to the study of science. Students conduct a variety of experiments, learning the scientific method in the areas of Earth, Life, and physical sciences.

Earth and Space Science

Earth Science provides students with an overview of three units related to the earth and beyond. It includes Earth’s Place in the Universe, Earth’s Systems, and Earth and Human Activity. Students explore the history and formation of the earth while also becoming familiar with tools that they will use throughout the remainder of the course. The study of earth’s history leads into a study of earth’s systems, where students explore the dynamic structure and patterns of earth including plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rock cycles, and weather. Students explore and analyze the ways in which human activity is changing and impacting Earth’s systems, and what humans ought to do to prevent and counteract large-scale landscape and resource degradation. Finally, students study the solar system and the sun-earth-moon system to see what exists beyond the atmosphere.

 

September- Introduction to Science Methods, Safety and Laboratory Design

October- Maps, Meteorology, and Tools for Earth and Space Science

November- Formation of Earth

December- Rocks, Rock Cycle, and Minerals

January- Plate Tectonics

February- Earthquakes and Volcanoes

March- Weather

April- Global Climate Change

May- Solar System and Sun-Earth-Moon System

 

Life Science

In Life Science students will explore the basis of life and life forms from the microscopic to macroscopic levels. Through a series of four units, students will learn: 1) the structure and processes of living beings from molecules to the level of the organism 2) the dynamic interactions that take place between organisms 3) heredity and the mechanisms through which traits are passed down or varied 4) the ways in which life contains unity within diversity of species. Students will begin by identifying the characteristics that define living beings and recognizing the necessary factors for life. They will begin to understand how the structures observed in living organisms have specialized functions which enable the organisms to survive. Students will take a look at organismal interactions at the level of ecosystems and communities to observe how energy flows through a system and how organisms depend upon one another for survival. They will learn how organisms reproduce, evolve, and diversify to understand how traits are passed on through generations. Finally, they will examine the human impacts on issues of biodiversity and extinction.

 

September-Introduction to Scientific Method, Safety, and Laboratory Design

October- Characteristics of Life

November-Matter and Energy in the Environment, Populations and Communities

December-Cell Structure and Function

January-Cell Cycle and Cell Division

February- Human Body Systems

March- Reproduction and Development

April-Genetics

May-Evolution, Biodiversity, and Human Impacts on Extinction

 

Physical Science

In physical science, students learn basic chemistry and physics through formulating questions about the physical environment, designing experiments to test questions, and through performing tests to attempt to answer those questions. Students will start at the atomic level with a unit on matter and its interactions where they focus on the structure and properties of matter and chemical reactions. Then they will focus on a unit of energy by examining the various types of energy that exist, and the resources through which humans extract energy. Thermal energy is examined separately, where students identify heat flow, conservation of energy, and energy inefficiencies with heating. The last half of the year focuses on the physics concepts of motion and forces, Newton’s Laws of Motion, waves, and electromagnetic waves.

 

September-Introduction to Scientific Methods, Safety, and Laboratory Design

October-Foundations of Chemistry and States of Matter

November-Understanding Atoms, Chemical Changes, and Chemical Reactions

December-Carbon Chemistry

January-Energy, Energy Resources, and Thermal Energy

February- Forces and Motion

March-Newton’s Laws

April-Waves

May-Electromagnetic Waves

 

 

 

STEM

STEM is a trimester long course where students explore issues of global climate change and engage in hands-on learning activities and design projects in order to understand technologies related to conserving the environment and reducing greenhouse gasses. This year’s science and STEM program is sponsored in part by the Boston Univeristy GLACIER K-12 NSF program, so the course is inspired through the work and research of scientists working to solve environmental issues at the local level of Massachusetts to the global scale on Antarctica. A resident organic chemist from Boston University will be working closely with the STEM program to help implement awareness of global change and provide special insights in the field of chemistry. This course will focus on four areas of environmental concern: Climate and the Chemistry of Climate Change; the Effects and Challenges of Fossil Fuels; The 3 Rs of Sustainable Systems; and the Effects on Plants, Animals, and Environment.

 

Weeks 1-3 Climate and Chemistry of Climate Change

Weeks 4-6 Effects and Challenges of Fossil Fuels

Weeks 7-9 3 Rs of Sustainable Systems

Weeks 10-12 Effects on Plants, Animals, Environment

 

Earth and Space Science

Earth Science provides students with an overview of three units related to the earth and beyond. It includes Earth’s Place in the Universe, Earth’s Systems, and Earth and Human Activity. Students explore the history and formation of the earth while also becoming familiar with tools that they will use throughout the remainder of the course. The study of earth’s history leads into a study of earth’s systems, where students explore the dynamic structure and patterns of earth including plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rock cycles, and weather. Students explore and analyze the ways in which human activity is changing and impacting Earth’s systems, and what humans ought to do to prevent and counteract large-scale landscape and resource degradation. Finally, students study the solar system and the sun-earth-moon system to see what exists beyond the atmosphere.

 

September- Introduction to Science Methods, Safety and Laboratory Design

October- Maps, Meteorology, and Tools for Earth and Space Science

November- Formation of Earth

December- Rocks, Rock Cycle, and Minerals

January- Plate Tectonics

February- Earthquakes and Volcanoes

March- Weather

April- Global Climate Change

May- Solar System and Sun-Earth-Moon System

 

Life Science

In Life Science students will explore the basis of life and life forms from the microscopic to macroscopic levels. Through a series of four units, students will learn: 1) the structure and processes of living beings from molecules to the level of the organism 2) the dynamic interactions that take place between organisms 3) heredity and the mechanisms through which traits are passed down or varied 4) the ways in which life contains unity within diversity of species. Students will begin by identifying the characteristics that define living beings and recognizing the necessary factors for life. They will begin to understand how the structures observed in living organisms have specialized functions which enable the organisms to survive. Students will take a look at organismal interactions at the level of ecosystems and communities to observe how energy flows through a system and how organisms depend upon one another for survival. They will learn how organisms reproduce, evolve, and diversify to understand how traits are passed on through generations. Finally, they will examine the human impacts on issues of biodiversity and extinction.

 

September-Introduction to Scientific Method, Safety, and Laboratory Design

October- Characteristics of Life

November-Matter and Energy in the Environment, Populations and Communities

December-Cell Structure and Function

January-Cell Cycle and Cell Division

February- Human Body Systems

March- Reproduction and Development

April-Genetics

May-Evolution, Biodiversity, and Human Impacts on Extinction

 

Physical Science

In physical science, students learn basic chemistry and physics through formulating questions about the physical environment, designing experiments to test questions, and through performing tests to attempt to answer those questions. Students will start at the atomic level with a unit on matter and its interactions where they focus on the structure and properties of matter and chemical reactions. Then they will focus on a unit of energy by examining the various types of energy that exist, and the resources through which humans extract energy. Thermal energy is examined separately, where students identify heat flow, conservation of energy, and energy inefficiencies with heating. The last half of the year focuses on the physics concepts of motion and forces, Newton’s Laws of Motion, waves, and electromagnetic waves.

 

September-Introduction to Scientific Methods, Safety, and Laboratory Design

October-Foundations of Chemistry and States of Matter

November-Understanding Atoms, Chemical Changes, and Chemical Reactions

December-Carbon Chemistry

January-Energy, Energy Resources, and Thermal Energy

February- Forces and Motion

March-Newton’s Laws

April-Waves

May-Electromagnetic Waves

 

 

 

STEM

STEM is a trimester long course where students explore issues of global climate change and engage in hands-on learning activities and design projects in order to understand technologies related to conserving the environment and reducing greenhouse gasses. This year’s science and STEM program is sponsored in part by the Boston Univeristy GLACIER K-12 NSF program, so the course is inspired through the work and research of scientists working to solve environmental issues at the local level of Massachusetts to the global scale on Antarctica. A resident organic chemist from Boston University will be working closely with the STEM program to help implement awareness of global change and provide special insights in the field of chemistry. This course will focus on four areas of environmental concern: Climate and the Chemistry of Climate Change; the Effects and Challenges of Fossil Fuels; The 3 Rs of Sustainable Systems; and the Effects on Plants, Animals, and Environment.

 

Weeks 1-3 Climate and Chemistry of Climate Change

Weeks 4-6 Effects and Challenges of Fossil Fuels

Weeks 7-9 3 Rs of Sustainable Systems

Weeks 10-12 Effects on Plants, Animals, Environment